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Mohammed Abdul Kahar,
"I Feared [The Police] Were Going to Kill Us All"

GERRI PEEV / The Scotsman (UK) 14jun2006

Mindfully.org note:
We're not sure how you all feel about events such as this,
but with all the agents of anti-terrorism "saving" us from terrorism, 
it's hard to feel safe anymore.

I saw an orange spark and a big bang.
There was
blood coming down my chest.
The first words I said to them was 'I can't breathe'
The first words they said to me were
'shut the fuck up' !

Mohammed Abdul Kahar, 23, who was shot during the June 2 operation in Forest Gate, and his brother Abul Koyair, 20, spoke out for the first time about their ordeal.

Abul Koyair, 20  (L) and his brother
Mohammed Abdul Kahar, 23, who was shot (R)

 

A MAN shot in the chest during a dawn raid on his home by anti-terror police told yesterday how he feared his family were going to be killed "one by one".

Mohammed Abdul Kahar, 23, broke down in tears as he described being wakened by his younger brother's screams as 250 police stormed his house in Forest Gate, London, on 2 June.

"I thought, one by one they're going to kill us. At that time, I thought I was going to die," he told a news conference.

He said he was shot and kicked in the face, before police officers dragged him downstairs and outside, slapped his face and told him to "shut the f*** up". He was then taken to hospital where he was given morphine and where he said surgeons were "pressured" by police to release him.

Speaking about his ordeal for the first time, Mr Kahar, a Royal Mail driver and part-time supermarket worker, described being hit in the chest by a bullet as he and his brother set off downstairs to investigate what they thought were armed robbers.

"I saw an orange spark and a big bang," he said. "There was blood coming down my chest. The first words I said to them was 'I can't breathe', and the first words they said to me were 'shut the f*** up'."

Mr Kahar and his brother Abul Koyair, 20, were detained for a week in high security police cells over suspicions they had a chemical bomb in their home. They were released without charge last Saturday. "This has ruined my life," Mr Kahar said.

Mr Koyair, a supermarket worker, said he feared police were trying to "murder" his brother.

The British-born Muslims, of Bengali origin, have always maintained their innocence, and yesterday they demanded a full apology from the police, although they stopped short of calling for the resignation of Sir Ian Blair, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner.

"She was screaming and crying. 
I thought one by one they are going to kill us. 
I was just shouting 'we've done nothing'. 
At that point I thought I was going to die"
- Mohammed Abdul Kahar

"I believe the only crime I have committed is being Asian and having a long-length beard," Mr Kahar said.

He added that he was not interested in financial compensation but in bringing the officers responsible to justice.

Last night, the Metropolitan Police issued an apology.

Andy Hayman, its assistant commissioner for specialist operations, said: "I am aware that in mounting this operation we have caused disruption and inconvenience to many residents in Newham, and more importantly those that reside at 46 and 48 Lansdowne Road. I apologise for the hurt that we may have caused."

Police searched the two properties but did not find the chemical device which "very specific intelligence" had indicated was there.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission's investigation into the raid is ongoing.

Tony Blair's official spokesman maintained that the Prime Minister stood by his support for the police 101 per cent.

"If the police and the security agencies had failed to act on the intelligence they received, then people would quite rightly have been critical," he said.

source: http://news.scotsman.com/uk.cfm?id=872502006&format=print 13jun2006


Young Muslim Shot
During Controversial Anti-Terror Raid

Press Association (UK) 13jun2006

 

The young Muslim shot during a controversial police anti-terror raid choked back the tears as he relived the moment he feared he and his family were going to be killed.

His dramatic and emotional account of the shooting prompted Scotland Yard to apologise, for the first time, for the "hurt" caused by the raid.

Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman issued a statement after the testimony of Mohammed Abdul Kahar, 23, and his brother Abul Koyair, 20, left the Metropolitan Police facing a string of serious allegations.

Mr Kahar claimed he was kicked in the face by a police officer, slapped and dragged down a stairway by his foot. He also alleged that he was fired on without warning.

With his arm in a sling and his voice close to breaking, Mr Kahar described how he suddenly saw an "orange spark", was flung against the wall, fell to the floor and then looked down to see blood and a hole in his chest. He claimed the police did not identify themselves before opening fire, there was no struggle with the officers and that he thought it was an armed robbery.

Mr Kahar and Mr Koyair were held for a week under anti-terror legislation at a high-security police station following the dawn raid on their house in Lansdown Road, Forest Gate, east London, on Friday, June 2. Police had been hunting for a suspected chemical bomb, but officers found nothing at the property and they were released without charge.

Flanked by their solicitors, the brothers gave their first account of the raid and the shooting at a church in Forest Gate. Recalling the moment he feared for his life, Mr Kahar said: "I heard them bringing my mum out. She was screaming and crying. I just thought... 'one by one they're going to kill us'. I was just shouting 'I ain't done nothing'. I was just worrying about my brothers, everyone. At that time I thought I was going to die."

Mr Kahar insisted violence was not in his nature, that he worked hard to support his parents and that his only apparent crime in the eyes of the police had been to be Asian "with a long length beard". He said it was not until he was dragged outside and saw police vans that he realised it was a raid, and that the ordeal had "ruined his life".

The whole affair is certain to pile further pressure on the beleaguered Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Ian Blair. In a statement, Mr Hayman said his force could not comment further on the circumstances of the shooting while the Independent Police Complaints Commission's investigation was ongoing. However, he did apologise for the "hurt" caused to local residents including those at the raided property.

"I am aware that in mounting this operation, we have, caused disruption and inconvenience to many residents in Newham and more importantly those that reside at 46 and 48 Lansdown Road," he said. "I apologise for the hurt that we may have caused."

source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uklatest/story/0,,-5884012,00.html 13jun2006


Police Apologise to Terror Raid Brothers

itv (UK) 13jun2006

 

The Metropolitan Police have apologised "for the hurt that we may have caused" to two brothers arrested in a terror raid on their east London home which detectives wrongly suspected was a bomb factory.

The apology comes after Mohammed Abdul Kahar, 23, who was shot during the June 2 operation in Forest Gate, and his brother Abul Koyair, 20, spoke out for the first time about their ordeal.

Mohammed Abdul Kahar, choking back tears, said: "My younger brother was screaming from upstairs. I got out of bed. I just had my boxer shorts on and a T-shirt. I could see his foot on the stairs coming down. I assumed a robbery was happening.

"There was an orange spark and a big bang. I flew onto the wall. I slipped down. I was on the floor. I looked down and blood was coming down my chest. I could see the hole in my chest. I knew I was shot. I put my hand over my face."

"I could hear my brother screaming more. I begged police 'please, I can't breathe'. He just kicked me in my face and screamed (an obscenity). One of them slapped me over the face."

"I thought one by one they are going to kill us. I was just shouting 'we've done nothing'. At that point I thought I was going to die."

In a statement, Scotland Yard's Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman said: "I am aware that in mounting this operation, we have, caused disruption and inconvenience to many residents in Newham and more importantly those that reside at 46 and 48 Lansdown Road.

"I apologise for the hurt that we may have caused."

He continued: "Given the nature of the threat I understand that some communities may be feeling confused, or indeed angry, with how the police are trying to ensure all our safety.

"The main objective of this operation was to pursue specific intelligence, which led us to that address."

Both were arrested when around 250 officers - some armed and some wearing chemical suits - raided their house in Lansdown Road.

They were held under anti-terror legislation at the high-security Paddington Green police station until the evening of June 9 when they were released. Over the weekend, about 250 demonstrators gathered outside Scotland Yard in protest.

The brothers' personal testimonies could pile more pressure on Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Ian Blair, who has faced fresh calls to resign since they were released without charge.

Speaking about the incident, their sister, Humeya Kalam, said armed police did not identify themselves when they burst into the house at around 4am. She thought the family home was being targeted by armed robbers and feared she would be killed.

She said: "What happened to us as a family was that police just stormed in. It was pitch dark, then there was light and guns everywhere. They were dragging innocent people to the floor, guns to their head, handcuffing. That's all I remember."

The police didn't identify themselves until I left the house. I was dragged down the stairs into the police van. When I saw the police van, obviously I realised these were police. I thought they were armed burglars and I was going to die."

"We are just a normal, average family. We don't know why this happened. I'm just as much bemused as everyone else. You would not expect to be woken up at 4am with a gun in your face. The only difference, I'm assuming, is that I am not white."

Asked if the brothers would be seeking compensation, she replied: "That is not even an issue. We are not even thinking about compensation at this point.

"I am thinking about my brother's recovery. Health comes before any sort of money. Money can't restore his health. They are in a considerable amount of pain, both physically and mentally."

source: http://www.itv.com/news/8b396cca3a5fc36e97a54a67f02df0e2.html 14jun2006


Terror Raid Pair May Claim 500,000

itv (UK) 11jun2006

 

The brothers arrested in a terror raid in East London last week may claim 500,000 [valued at $919,900 USD on 14jun2006] compensation and will sue for libel damages.

Mohammed Abdul Kahar and Abul Koyair, 23 and 20, were released without charge on Friday, after being held for a week.

Police found no trace of a chemical device at the brothers' home in Forest Gate, east London, during which Mohammed Abdul Kahar was shot.

Now Gareth Pierce, the family's lawyer, has said they will sue for libel damages, in addition to potential compensation.

Gareth Pierce, the lawyer acting for the family, told a newspaper: "It will not be enough the emotional damage will be enormous.

"Some individuals never recover from an incident like this.

"Nobody identified themselves as police as they stormed in wearing terrifying black hoods and started bashing them over the head.

"They only realised they were officers when they saw the word 'police' on their backs."

source: http://www.itv.com/news/8b396cca3a5fc36e97a54a67f02df0e2.html 14jun2006

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