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Pollen flow between herbicide tolerant canola (Brassica napus) 

is the cause of multiple resistant canola volunteers

WSSA Abstracts, 2000 Meeting of the Weed Society of America, Volume 40, 2000

L.M. Hall,* J. Huffman, and K.Topinka, Alberta Agric., Food and Rural Development, Edmonton, AC; and A. Good, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton.

In 1998, a field was investigated in which canola volunteers were not controlled by several applications of glyphosate.
In 1997, the field had been planted with imidazolinone-tolerant and glufosinate-tolerant canola, but an adjacent field had contained glyphosate tolerant canola. Seeds from 35 volunteers were sprayed with glyphosate at 440 gai/ha and survivors sprayed with either glufosinate or imazethapyr at 400, 50 gai ha"1 respectively. Where seed number permitted (14 plants) seedlings were also sequentially sprayed with glyphosate, glufosinate and imazethapyr, at 440/400/50 gai ha-1. In total, 48% of the seedlings were resistant to glyphosate, with resistance diminishing with distance from the putative pollen source. Seedlings from all 9 plants collected from the glufosinate-tolerant area showed multiple resistance to glyphosate and glufosinate while seedlings from ten of 11 plants collected from the imidazolinone-tolerant area showed resistant to imazethapyr and glyphosate. Two seedlings were resistant to all three herbicides. DNA analysis of the seedlings indicated contributions from more than one resistant parent, clearly indicating that the multiple resistance had arisen from pollen transfer, rather than mutation. Evidence is consistent with resistant gene movement via pollen flow from one field to another. The presence of multiple resistant canola volunteers suggests altered management modifications for canola volunteers

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